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    Dealing with hormonal acne?

    • 2 min read

    Acne is an incredibly common skin condition, affecting people of all ages. The physical appearance of acne is a symptom of an imbalance occurring in the body. There are various causes of acne including clogged pores, excess oil production, an imbalance in bacteria, and hormonal imbalances. Things that can make your acne worse include hormonal changes during different stages of your cycle, certain medications, diet, and STRESS.1

    Everyone’s skin is different, so it is important to speak with a health care practitioner for questions specific to your skin health. As clear-skin enthusiasts, we have read up on what foods may help your body at a foundational level. These are our top 5 suggestions:

    1. Probiotic-rich foods – studies are showing promising results with the inclusion of probiotics in patients suffering from acne.2
    2. Eat a healthy, low-glycemic diet - There’s evidence that eating a low glycemic diet, meaning one that doesn’t include lots of processed grains/flour products and added sugar, is one the best home remedies for acne because it can help prevent it.3
    3. Healthy fats - are essential to good skin health, so include foods rich in omega-3s like wild-caught salmon.
    4. Zinc-rich foods (pumpkin seeds, kefir, seafood, beans) – according to recent research, there is a correlation between low zinc levels and the severity of acne.4
    5. Vitamin A-rich foods (sweet potato, spinach, carrots) – similarly to zinc, research has shown a correlation between low vitamin A levels and an increase in acne.5

    If you have identified yourself as suffering from stress related acne, then we would suggest implementing some lifestyle techniques like mediation, yoga, and scheduling in breaks for yourself throughout the day. To help relieve the symptoms of stress you may want to try Adrenasmart as an added supplement to your daily routine.

    As hormones play a role in our skin health, Estrosmart is great supplement to maintain a healthy estrogen-to-progesterone balance. 

     

    References:

    1. Acne, Symptoms and Causes. Mayo Clinic. Accessed: July 30th 2020, https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acne/symptoms-causes/syc-20368047

    2. Baquerizo Nole KL, Yim E, Keri JE. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(4):814-821. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2014.04.050

    3.Robyn N Smith, Neil J Mann, Anna Braue, Henna Mäkeläinen, George A. Varigos, A low-glycemic-load diet improves symptoms in acne vulgaris patients: a randomized controlled trial, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 86, Issue 1, July 2007, Pages 107–115, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/86.1.107

    4. Rostami Mogaddam M, Safavi Ardabili N, Maleki N, Soflaee M. Correlation between the severity and type of acne lesions with serum zinc levels in patients with acne vulgaris. Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:474108. doi:10.1155/2014/474108

    5. Ozuguz P, Dogruk Kacar S, Ekiz O, Takci Z, Balta I, Kalkan G. Evaluation of serum vitamins A and E and zinc levels according to the severity of acne vulgaris. Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2014;33(2):99-102. doi:10.3109/15569527.2013.808656